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July 12, 2010

Comments

Outstanding, what an amazing way to convey your current thoughts and opinions? Cool I must say? I do think you're correct. Hope to read more write-ups from your end and I am seriously looking ahead for it.
20110124pilipalagaga

I wonder, are you still having the same conversations you were having 3 years ago? 5 years ago? The paradigms of health, branding, marketing - they are all shifting in dramatic ways, and to remain relevant, you must learn to change your tune, reinvent the conversation, picture things differently.

Got off the TM express and never looked back! I migrated off of TM and BM last year. No more system crashes. No more messing with logmein for remote access. It was a really great program but was owned by a company that slowly destroyed it. I made the decision to migrate as soon as the announcement to sunset BM came out. What a relief !

We followed TM all the way from Version 2.0 to 9.0. What a disappointment. Since Lexis Nexis acquired Datatxt, they have done nothing but release yearly upgrades (I use the term loosely) which were increasingly bloated and subject to locking up. Then they decided to really get predatory and insist that the only way to get support for any version was to sign up for the Annual Maintenance Plan in which they charged exhorbitant fees for you to debug their increasingly buggy releases. No Thanks. I'm done with Time Matters and Lexis Nexis. I would prefer to migrate my data back to version 3.0 if I could. In fact, version 9.0 didn't really add anything meaningful other than a lot more lock-ups. So Sayonara you under-performing predatory #@%*&'s

As I have previously noted, I made this decision two years ago when the writing was on the wall. Just give me a simple program (non-SaaS since I expect a solar flare to fry the satellites within the next three years!!) that I can transfer from TM and BM, keep track of time, prepare bills like in Timeslips 5, and post my Word 2003 and Firefox docs and emails to, and get the hell out of the way. (Damn, I may have to write it myself!!)

I can only agree with your assessment of Lexis Nexis Time Matters. I reluctantly moved from Version 6 to Version 10 earlier this year. I found no significant changes and certainly no improvements. To add insult to injury, the Excel macro to save documents to Time Matters did not work with Excel 2003. After spending almost two hours with the much touted technical support, I was told that the problem would be addressed in a service release.
Although I never edited an Excel macro before, after about 10 minutes of tinkering, I found several lines of code that had been added to the macro by the geniuses at Time Matters. I commented out all ten lines of code and never looked back. I certainly do not want to debug more code by installing the latest service pack. Unfortunately, I depend on this software in practice and have not any substitutes to date.

Is it just me, or have software prices gone up since the introduction of SAAS? With some SAAS solutions for case management costing upwards of $80/month/user ($960/year/user), I have started to wonder if software vendors aren't raising their pricing to SAAS levels?

Although, I wouldn't include Office 2010 in your predatory pricing analysis. The fact is the price of Office has been coming down through the years. Office 2003 and 2007 Standard were both priced at $399 new and $239 for the upgrade. You can get Office 2010 Home and Business over at Amazon for around $220 for the disc version and around $180 for the product key (download) version. Both of those are less than the prior upgrade prices for Office 2003/2007. Plus, the disc version includes an extra license that you can install on a secondary computer that you use.

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